Food and sport: what to eat before, during and after training

For the authors of this practical manual, prepared jointly by a cook and a dietitian-nutritionist specialized in sports nutrition, a diet focused on achieving maximum physical performance does not have to be synonymous with boring and tasteless dishes.

A good example of this are the 60 healthy and appetizing recipes that they include in their work.

  • Among others, you will find how to make an appetizing chia pudding, some sweet potato pancakes , a risotto with seaweed or a white fish tartar.

As you can see, they are simple proposals that perhaps you do not cook because when it comes to shopping, you simply do not think about acquiring certain ingredients.

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But recipes are not the only strong point in this manual. It also provides diet guidelines designed specifically for the athlete , both before and during and after training.

Thanks to them, you will achieve the perfect balance between what you eat and what you burn. Among them we highlight the following.

WHAT SHOULD NOT BE MISSING IN YOUR PANTRY

Basic products such as rice, olive oil and nuts. But neither do others that, if you have them at hand, will make your menus more varied: bulgur, amaranth, coconut oil, vegetable drinks, agave syrup, goji berries …

ANIMAL PROTEINS: HOW MANY SHOULD YOU TAKE?

For a person who is not a sports professional and who trains 3 times a week, Ferreira and Heulin recommend taking a serving (between 50 and 200 grams, depending on body weight) of meat, fish or eggs a day.

  • On the other hand, for professional athletes they recommend 2 daily servings.

DAIRY, SOURCE OF CALCIUM

The ideal is to take 3 dairy products a day, preferably semi-skimmed and as natural as possible (without sweeteners, thickeners, sugars, additives …).

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  • Those who do not consume dairy products must guarantee their calcium contribution with other sources rich in this mineral (cabbages, almonds, enriched vegetable drinks, dried figs, sesame …), the authors of the manual point out.

HYDRATES AND VEGETABLES: IN WHAT PROPORTION?

When taking into account the amounts of vegetables and starches (present in cereals, legumes, potatoes …) in your dishes, it is essential if you are going to train on that day or not and what the intensity and time will be. For example…

  • On non-training days, 2/3 parts of the plate should be occupied by vegetables, and 1/3 part starches. At dinner, vegetables should take 3/4 of the plate and carbohydrates 1/4.

When you cook them, always try to leave them al dente

  • If you are going to train, but you do it gently, at noon fill half a plate with vegetables and the other half with starches. During dinner, the proportion of vegetables (2/3) increases compared to that of hydrates (1/3).
  • If the training is more intense, or long, take 1/3 of vegetables and 2/3 of starches at lunch, and divide the plate in two at dinner.

As for the fruit, they recommend taking 3 servings a day, and that they be varied.

HYDRATING WELL IS ESSENTIAL

As a general rule, you should drink at least 1.5 liters of water a day.

During the training

While you exercise, drink every 15-30 minutes, from 3 to 4 sips (per hour you should add between 500 and 800 ml).

After training

To know how much it is convenient to drink, weigh yourself after the effort. Ideally, you should drink 1.5 times more of the weight lost.

1% dehydration lowers performance by up to 10%

  • For example, if you lost 500 g during training, then you should drink 750 ml, immediately and continuously.

Ferreira and Heulin advise that it is best to opt for a sparkling water rich in bicarbonates.

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